Tag Archives: Diabetes

This looks like it could be a great tool! I wonder if I can take a peek at the code book before buying?

See Jen Dance

My CDE noticed my new appreciation for making things from scratch. (Or more often than not, having my husband make things from scratch for me because I hate cooking.) She also noticed that my blood sugars are being poorly affected from miscalculating carb counts in fresh foods.

The quinoa bake was a really good example of the mistakes one can make during insulin dosing. (Seriously… why do pasta and grain packages only give you nutrition information for dry portions?) Since I was getting frustrated not knowing exactly what I was eating when making things from scratch, she suggested I get a scale. But not just any scale – one that measures carbs and other nutrition facts for a multitude of other foods.

I bought one this weekend. Here is my Perfect Portions Nutrition Scale.

IMG_0587

Don’t get me wrong. This is a small investment. My little $5 scale pales in comparison…

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Hole-y Swim Fingers!

Hole-y diabetic swim fingers Batman!

Extended periods of time in the pool give everyone wrinkly fingers, but time after time I’m shocked by what happens to fingers that have been pricked hundreds and hundreds of times.

Normally they just have small marks, like polkadots, on their finger tips. But when the skin shrinks up and gets wrinkly they look like tiny little sponges!

The kids gets a kick out of it, for now.

These are Luke’s fingers, after 4 years of blood glucose checks. I wonder what they will look like in 10 more years. Does this ever go away?

The Disappearing Gingerbread House

Evie made a spectacular gingerbread house in her class on Wednesday! It was great fifth grade Christmas fun. She brought it home carefully and put it on top of her dresser.

Evie and her gingerbread house

Note the presence of a roof. And the copious amount of candy decorating the roof and yard.

This….is the same house, this evening:

Pilfered gingerbread house

I was perplexed why her blood sugar was 476 mg/dL at 1:00am, but I think I have a pretty good idea now of what happened!

Anyone else have a T1D with a massive sweet tooth?

Common Unity

com·mu·ni·ty    kǝ-‘myü-nǝ-tē\  n.   
            1. A unified body of individuals.

We were blessed to spend our Thanksgiving this year with a wonderful group of new friends. This group of people has been working together, living together, and celebrating together throughout the evolution of life over the past ten-plus years. They are singles, couples, parents and children, and soon-to-be-parents. The group has shifted and changed over time, but their core values persevere:

Love. Compassion. Support. Joy. Family.

Put into practice, these values result in acceptance, generosity, genuine interest in the lives and hearts of other people, true emotional connection, and gatherings that are dang fun.

Something new that my brood and I bring to the group is diabetes. Insulin, pumping, finger sticks, hypos, infusion sets, middle-of-the-night alarms, carbohydrate counting–these are things that are now so pervasive in our lives that I’ve almost completely lost the perspective of life without diabetes. Spending extended time like this with new friends makes me more aware of just how burdensome and strange it all can be.

For example, another mom in the group offered to take Luke home with her from the park we were all at to play with her son, and it took me nearly a full 60 seconds of silent internal deliberation, calculation, and trouble-shooting to even answer her. And then I had to give The Plan. And then I made mental notes about absolute times when I was going to need to call and check-in. Would 1 hour be too long? I’m sure I seemed like a crazy person.

And did I wake anyone when I was shuffling through the house, barely conscious at 3 o’clock in the morning, to maneuver through a pile of sleeping kids and check blood sugars? Did anyone notice the vacant stare I adopt when my kids sit down with a plate of food and I’m mentally analyzing and calculating the carbohydrate content? That fleeting look of panic when someone starts to cut up pie?

Evie learns to make pecan pie from scratch. Score!

Evie learns to make pecan pie from scratch. Score!

The great thing about this cohesive group was their acceptance and attendant willingness to learn about what makes our world go ’round. People asked questions. They talked to my kids about their experiences and were interested in the answers. They watched me change infusion sets and dial in boluses, asked me about food and routines, and just genuinely cared about us.

And that’s what is so valuable about being part of a community. Whether it’s a small group of friends and family, a church or social circle, a local support group, or the larger cultural or medical communities, it’s valuable and vital to be able to share your struggles, burdens, accomplishments and joys with people who share some common thread. A common unity.

Everyone needs a community.

Kids have a remarkable ability to meld into relatively cohesive groups within hours of meeting each other.

Kids have a remarkable ability to meld into relatively cohesive groups within hours of meeting each other.

An Amusing 2 am Blood Sugar Check

Things like this remind me that the fingers I’m poking belong to a six-year-old boy. Luke rocked his beloved new skate gloves all through the night. Good thing they are fingerless!

All For A Free Shower

“Mom, I only have 6.7 units left in my pump.”

These words were uttered during breakfast this morning, about five minutes before we were set to leave for school. Five. Minutes.

Evie is fairly self-sufficient with her insulin pump. Self-sufficient in that she knows how to perform the operations herself, not so self-sufficient that she notices and acknowledges things like low-reservoir and missed-bolus alarms. This happens a lot. Luckily, we’re pretty quick with the set changes.

Ok. FIve minutes. I can do this. She has to finish eating anyways.

But then, Evie made an impassioned plea to save her set change for after her pre-birthday-party shower this afternoon. Could she do an injection bolus for breakfast and lunch and save the rest of her pump insulin for her basal needs for the day? After my shower? Please?

Oh, sweet girl.

I take for granted the ability to simply take a shower without having a medical device adhered to my body. If you’re a pump wearer, it must feel really, really great to be able to soap up without worrying about scrubbing your infusion set off in the process. To have your body completely free of adhesive tape and invasive plastic cannulas, if only for the time it takes for a good, long shower.

So we’re doing a combination of injections and pumping today to get her through to that highly-anticipated free shower. It’s sure to confuse the Bolus Wizard–the name given to the complicated algorithms the pump uses to calculate dosages–but that’s what our backup brainpower is for.

If that’s the normalcy she is craving today, then we’ll do the extra work to help her find it.

Halloween Prep: It’s Scary Out There!

Halloween. Witches, skeletons, goblins, and ghouls. Angsty teenagers in horror movie costumes. Scary indeed. But what’s even scarier for a type 1 mom?

Sugar.

Gobs of it. At school, at the store, even in my own kitchen, where a huge bag of mixed fun-sized candy sits waiting for Wednesday night’s trick-or-treaters.

I loved Halloween as a kid; coming home with 5 pounds of free candy and gorging on it for the next two weeks was the highlight of the season. And as a parent, I used to enjoy seeing my kids get excited for the same thing.

In anticipation of massive loads of sugar over the next few days, I’m filling the pump reservoirs with more insulin than usual.

But now the fun-sized Snickers and M&M’s give me nothing but anxiety. Even with the dual insulin pumps, which made candy boluses much quicker and easier, blood sugar management during Halloween is a nightmare. Pockets get filled with treats that mysteriously disappear, candy is stashed here and there (I even found a few Smarties under Luke’s pillow yesterday morning), and everyone loses track of how many pieces of candy corn they’ve munched on.

And even if we bolused absolutely perfectly for every bit of sugar, the quick absorption outpaces the action of the insulin and pretty soon….hyperglycemia craziness.

What to do? One mom saves the 15-gm carb candies to treat low-blood sugars (Skittles are tastier than glucose tablets!) and cuts out a few parties. Read her great ideas here. It also helps to be prepared with carbohydrate counts. Paradoxically, fun-sized candies aren’t required to have Nutrition Facts labels, which makes bolusing a real challenge. How many carbs do you suppose that Charleston Chew has? Arming yourself with the relevant numbers is key: here’s a good chart. And another one here and here.

We’re in the process of Halloween candy negotiations right now. I’m going to let my kids have whatever candy they want on Halloween night, save some for treating lows later, keep a few for after-meal treats the rest of the week, and then buy the rest off of them. We’ll see how it goes.

The Ninja, Abby Bominable, and Camo Guy (what IS this costume???)