Tag Archives: Insulin Pump

DBlog Week 2013, Day Two: We, The Undersigned

Click for the We, The Undersigned – Tuesday 5/14 Link List

“Recently various petitions have been circulating the Diabetes Online Community, so today let’s pretend to write our own. Tell us who you would write the petition to – a person, an organization, even an object (animate or inanimate) – get creative!! What are you trying to change and what have you experienced that makes you want this change?”

ParadigmRevelPump_ProductImage

To: Medtronic

Re: The MiniMed Paradigm® Revel™ Insulin Pump

Petition: We, the undersigned (me), feel that the MiniMed Paradigm® Revel™ Insulin Pump should be programmed to, at the very least, flash brilliantly and emit a siren sound when the pump reservoir completely runs out of insulin.

Yes, I know there is an alarm that tells me when the reservoir is low, and I know I have control over at what remaining volume the alarm sounds.

But I have lots going on. And two insulin pumps to keep track of. And one child who rarely even tells me when her pump alarms. And while the regular “boop beep boop” sound is fine to remind me that the reservoir is running low, there really should be a different kind of alarm for when the insulin level finally reaches “–.–” (empty).

Because there’s not a different alarm, there’s no way to know when the pump runs dry, and then its a guessing game to determine how much insulin they’ve actually received. (“How long has your pump been alarming like this??? It’s completely empty!!!“)

I need something that will get my attention.

Like flashing LED lights and a horn sound. Which would also serve as a deterrent for my forgetful daughter. Can you imagine having that happen in the lunchroom at school? She’d never forget again!

I love my kids’ pumps. They are fabulous and I have no other issues with them besides this. So please, Medtronic, help out a busy mom and build this flashing-light-loud-and-insistent-can’t-miss-it-alarm feature into your future models. Is that too much to ask?

DBlog Week 2013, Day One: Share And Don’t Share

Click for the Share And Don’t Share-Monday 5/13/13 List of DBlog Post Links

DBlog Week is an entire week in which diabetes bloggers will be posting daily using pre-determined writing prompts. I’ve never written every day for a week before, so this is going to stretch my brain in a new (and hopefully interesting) way. I can’t promise that the chaos of my life won’t interfere….some posts may happen in the wee hours of the night….but I’ll do my best to write on every topic!

So here goes….

“Often our health care team only sees us for about 15 minutes several times a year, and they might not have a sense of what our lives are really like. Today, let’s pretend our medical team is reading our blogs. What do you wish they could see about your and/or your loved one’s daily life with diabetes? On the other hand, what do you hope they don’t see?”

First off, our endo provider is also a parent of type-1 diabetic kids, so I know he already “gets it” in the visceral sort of way that providers without type 1 kids can’t. All of the anxiety, stress, worry, chaos, uncertainty, and fatigue that I feel is something I know he understands. That’s a blessing when it’s time to come in for those dreaded check-in appointments.

So for all the other providers out there who don’t have such a personal connection to Type 1, I wish they could see that I eat, sleep, and breathe diabetes. It’s ever-present in my mind; sometimes at the forefront, when I’m in the middle of carb counting or a set-change for instance, and sometimes just as a low-level anxiety, like a mosquito buzzing in my ear.

I download insulin pumps every two weeks to search for patterns and make pump adjustments. I memorize food labels and ingredient lists. I organize and keep inventory of our myriad diabetes supplies. I skip sleep to make sure I get middle of the night blood sugar checks and corrections done. I read about diabetes. I research available technology. I troubleshoot, and I problem-solve, and I teach, and I teach some more. I haggle with our insurance and mail-order pharmacy for hours. I worry about exerting too much control over their food choices. I worry about exerting too little control over their food choices. I worry about everything, and yet I know that I’m doing the best I can.

I take that on as a mom so that my kids don’t have to feel that, and so it doesn’t dictate our family life. I keep a straight face even as I’m stressing about their upcoming A1C results, so they don’t ever feel like they’re burdening me. I talk with them about their diabetes in an age-appropriate way, all the while thinking about the very real and life threatening implications of the disease.

It’s a lot, and sometimes it’s overwhelming. What I never want my providers to see (but which I have to cop to), is that we sometimes go 4-5 days on an infusion set because I don’t have a great system for remembering to change them. My kids eat more treats than I’d like and is good for them. A lot of the time we’re rushing around and I do things like forget their diabetes kit, or that they needed more strips. Lancet-changing….doesn’t happen.

An although I know I’m doing the best I can, there’s always room to do better. I’m going to be so happy when I’m doing enough to finally see some good Hemoglobin A1C numbers. More on that another time….

A Hypo Mystery

I'm going to need to restock the juice box supply.

So many juice boxes this week….

If Luke is coming up on a site change and it’s close to bedtime, he usually asks me to wait until he’s asleep. No problem. I can pull off his old infusion set and place his new one and he doesn’t even bat an eye.

So last Wednesday night that’s what I did. I also took the liberty to place his new set on a little used place on his body, his upper thigh, for the sake of good rotation.

His BG the next morning was 48, which sometimes happens after a site change, so he downed a juice box to start his day. Pre-lunch BG was 270, he ate about a cup of ziti noodles with red sauce, we bolused for a small BG correction and 45 grams of carbohydrate, and I sent him off to school. An hour later he was 47.

What the….what?

The next day he had nearly the same scenario at school, plus a couple more low-40’s hypos at home. So I pulled his thigh site that night and placed a new one on the back of his arm, the old tried-and-true standby.

Incidentally, both days he was uncharacteristically irritable and aggressive at school and found himself in time out several times. He typically gets spacey and whiny when he’s low, but he doesn’t usually have so much trouble controlling his behavior.

My (loose) theory is that the thigh site was too close to the muscle (this skinny little boy is pretty short on adipose tissue) which caused a too-rapid uptake of his meal boluses. And then the resulting quick drop in his blood glucose caused extra irritability and crazy-boy behavior.

Either that or his pancreas has rebooted.

(Kidding, kidding….)